Monthly Archives: July 2017

Travel Pet Insurance

Recent changes to the UK’s quarantine laws mean that it is now possible for you to obtain a pet passport (under the government’s ‘passport for pets’ scheme) and take your family pet away with you on holiday. However, before you run off down to your local travel agent and book tickets for the whole family to that exotic seaside tropical location you have always wanted to visit but have to put off because everyone else at home didn’t want to leave Fido in the kennel, you might want to consider getting you and your family some travel insurance – including that all important travel pet insurance.

A number of leading pet insurance providers now offer pet owners travel pet insurance to give pet owners the comfort of knowing whether they are far away in exotic places enjoying the sun and sea or closer to home enjoying the cultural delights of Europe, their pet will be insured against any illness or mishap that may unfortunately befall them.

Typically, included in the travel pet insurance is:

– x-rays
– injections
– lab tests
– prescriptions
– costs while they stay at the vet and recuperate

Keep in mind, however, that as with other types of insurance, travel pet insurance usually comes with what is known as an excess. In short, what this means is that you – as the owner if the pet – will be required to pay a certain amount until a threshold amount is reached. Thereafter you can claim for a reimbursement against the insurance provider. However, unlike humans, travel pet insurance premiums are usually calculated on the type of animal you have and the age of the animal. As such, it is possible to leave arranging the travel pet insurance policy until the last minute, then purchasing this online once you have decided that you will definitely be taking your family pet away with you on your family holidays!

Moreover, as with human travel insurance policies, pet travel insurance can be purchased either as annual policy or as a one-off travel policy. If you get an annual pet travel policy, this means you can take your pet with you whenever you travel one of the 25+ countries outside of the UK which the UK government currently has arrangements for the ‘passport for pets’ scheme, or any of the European Union countries (which are all part of the ‘passport for pets’ scheme already). Alternatively, with one-off pet travel insurance policies you need to name the country you are going to visit and the dates you’ll be there and the policy will only cover you for the duration and place stated.

ilmmuseum Potsdam & Babelsburg

uring the Cold War, Potsdam was the Hollywood of the DDR (the Deutsches Demokratisches Republik), and Babelsburg was the name of the studio at which all the films were produced. Now, however, it’s a museum within an hour’s journey from Berlin. Potsdam is easily accessible via S-bahn, and the museum is within walking distance of the Potsdam Hauptbahnhof (the main train station in Potsdam). The museum has a very modest entrance fee, but once inside, you are treated to all kinds of movie memorabilia.

Those who have visited the museum prior to 2005 will remember that not the entire museum at the was translated into English, but enough of it was visual so that a visitor who spoke no German could still enjoy it. The permanent exhibit is both intellectual and fun in that it deals with the politics of the 20th century and how it influenced film production. Even if one has zero interest in politics, the various film props and costumes are of interest. The exhibit is pleasingly interactive, but not overwhelmingly so: there are touch screens that quiz the visitor on which scenes movies come from, for example, and one can listen to interviews about the filmmaking process.

There are film screenings every day, usually for an extra charge. Naturally these films are usually in German, but there are English-language screenings, too, usually of fairly recent award-winning films. The best part of the museum, though, is the children’s exhibit, which is fairly unusual for a German museum. During the 1950’s and 1960’s, the studio produced many children’s films that were of traditional fairy tales. At the time of my visit, there was a large interactive exhibit featuring real items from Babelsburg sets, so children can really “experience” the movies for themselves.

Even very little children or non German-speakers can have fun with the visual and tactile aspects. The exhibit incorporates video and computer touch-screens for a really immersive experience. Families traveling with small children will find this a great treat.

Even the museum’s café is worth a visit. It’s not very overpriced, and the food with a Turkish-influence and a hint of Italian is memorable and served by friendly wait staff.